Amalfi and Beyond!

A few weeks ago I was transported to, what felt like, another planet.  My journey began in Naples and ended in Rome.  The in-between was the best part; the Amalfi Coast. I had heard about the Amalfi Coast, but never really thought about going there until my family decided to plan a hiking trip through one of those organized tour groups. This one happened to be VBT (Vermont Bicycle Touring). I have never been a fan of “organized” trips, but this one changed my mind. This was, by far, the best way to see the coast! (unless, of course, you want to hire private cars/boats for everyhing). I’ve weeded through my pictures and have decided to post them here along with some commentary. Sorry for some repeats from Facebook. Let’s get started……

I’ll spare you the details about our lost luggage (we got them back after 2 days)… So, we arrived in Naples!

Naples struck me as pretty “gritty” — quite possibly the Brooklyn of Italy. We didn’t get to explore Naples very much, but I was okay with that. We were lucky enough to stay by the water in a nice port area near the Castel dell ‘Ovo… We stayed at the Hotel Santa Lucia in an area called “Chiaia”….

Hotel Santa Lucia - Naples
Hotel Santa Lucia – Naples

We just strolled around the area for the rest of the afternoon and took some pictures of the small port and tried some local pizza, pasta, wine, and veggies.

Marina near Castel dell 'Ovo
Marina near Castel dell ‘Ovo

One of the cool things about starting in Naples was that we got to see Vesuvius for the first time. This made me even more curious about our upcoming tour of the ruins of Pompeii. I kept envisioning the locals running from the hot lava, only to be encapsulated by it — literally.

View of Vesuvius from the Marina near Castel dell 'Ovo
View of Vesuvius from the Marina near Castel dell ‘Ovo

Here’s a local Napoletana enjoying the sun! She’s got the right idea!

Local Napoletana catching some sun!
Local Napoletana catching some sun!

Here’s a local fisherman, or longshoreman… or…. plumber?

Napolitano Butt Crack!
Napolitano Butt Crack!

This is Castel dell ‘Ovo. The current castle was built in the 15th century. The name comes from the legend that the Roman poet Virgil buried an egg on the site for protection.

Castel dell 'Ovo
Castel dell ‘Ovo
Colorful building in the Chiaia area (waterfront)
Colorful building in the Chiaia area (waterfront)

My first Italian “selfie” in front of Vesuvius

My first exposure to Naples
My first exposure to Naples

Some of the streets in this area of Naples were very steep and gave me a small preview of the “switch-backs” that were to come along the Amalfi Coast.

Zig zagged streets in the Chiaia section of Naples
Zig zagged streets in the Chiaia section of Naples

After our half a day and night in Naples we geared up and got ready for our hiking tour meeting and the transfer to Pompeii.  We had a private bus and our guides provided so much information about history, culture, and other little tidbits — they were also quite humorous!

We arrived in Pompeii and we were greeted by a local who gave us a private tour of the ruins of Pompeii. I was a little turned off at first becuase the ruins just seemed too touristy. I was hoping to get to get a private tour of some untouched ruins in an area where civilization no longer existed — NOPE! People galore! My mom and I also got scolded by the Italian bathroom attendant — I still to this day don’t know what we did wrong. So, the tour ended up being fantastic despite all the people, I felt like our group had the ruins to ourselves at times. I really learned a lot; more than I expected. For example — the ancient Romans really liked to express themselves with phallic shapes and symbols. They also used graffiti to mark their territory and exploit their sexual conquests.

Below is a mosaic that was unearthed in Pompeii.

Mosaic in Pompeii
Mosaic in Pompeii

These are some unearthed clay pots – hard to believe that the volcano erupted in 79 AD and that these pots are even older.

Unearthed clay pots in Pompeii
Unearthed clay pots in Pompeii

Here’s a plastered cast of the exact position this dog was in when the lava from Vesuvius ended his/her life.

Plaster statue of a dog succumbed by the ashes of Vesuvius.
Plastered cast of a dog succumbed by the ashes of Vesuvius.

And here is a plastered cast of a human that had an unfortunate ending.

Plastered cast of someone that died from the eruption of Vesuvius
Plastered cast of someone that died from the eruption of Vesuvius

We toured a bath house and aquaduct while in Pompeii; below is a photo of some of the wall docorations.  Once again, hard to believe this was built prior to 79 AD.

Walls inside a bath house in Pompeii
Walls inside a bath house in Pompeii
More Roman statues in a bath house in Pompeii.
More Roman statues in a bath house in Pompeii.

Below is a fountain in the bath house – it has names of local politicians around the edges of it. Even back then they paid to have their name on things!

Bath house decoration
Bath house fountain

I loved this statue –  it’s a 2nd century BC statue of Faunus (Bacchus). It’s amazing that they were able to unearth this; it was re-discovered in 1830 during an excavation.

Second century BC statue  of Faunus (Bacchus) in Pompeii.
Second century BC statue of Faunus (Bacchus) in Pompeii.

Here’s an example of some of the phallic art found all over Pompeii. Big egos in Pompeii!

an example of the phallic art found around Pompeii! this is a fesco featuring a large penis.
An example of the phallic art found around Pompeii! this is a fresco featuring a large penis.

At the end of the tour we got a good view of Vesuvius. It’s crazy that the lava came from that volcano and destroyed villages on its path.

View of Vesuvius from Pompeii
View of Vesuvius from Pompeii

This table was owned by Julius Caesar’s assassin.

Table owned by Julius Caesar's assassin.
Table owned by Julius Caesar’s assassin
Amphitheatre of Pompeii
Amphitheatre of Pompeii

This might be a little morbid, but here are plastered casts of people in their final moments. They were overwhelmed by gases and lava.

Plastered casts of people in their last moments when the volcano hit...
Plastered casts of people in their last moments when the volcano hit…

As we were exiting the ruins, we literally stumbled upon these stray dogs. There were 5-6 of them just having an afternoon siesta. We learned that they are actually spoiled and have free reign of the ruins.

Stray dog of Pompeii
Stray dog of Pompeii

After our 3 hour tour of Pompeii we got back in the private bus and headed to Sorrento — it took about 45 minutes. This journey took us through the longest tunnel I have ever been in! It wasn’t for someone who doesn’t like tunnels but I managed just fine. As we arrived in Sorrento, we pulled into our fabulous hotel; Grand Hotel Cocumella. The hotel was an old cloister/monestary. Here’s some interesting history of the hotel: “The history of the Grand Hotel Cocumella began in 1597, when the Jesuits built a cloister in a rural area with orchards and citrus grove sloping seaward. According to legend the gods had given custody of the secret garden to the nymph Colomeide that to all those who would have entered into that magical place, she would have given the gift of “silence.” In 1777 the building changed hands and it was converted into an hotel, becoming the most ancient destination of recreation and rest of the Sorrento peninsula.

The Grand Hotel Cocumella retains all the charm that for centuries has seduced travellers around the world. The important work of restoration by the architect Nino Del Papa enhanced the splendor that suits the myth of the ancient residence, appreciated over the years by guests such as Joachim Murat, Johann Wolfgang Goethe, the Duke of Wellington, Hans Christian Andersen , Alberto Moravia. These are only some of the big names on the ancient guestbook, still accurately preserved.”

A little cove built into the steps leading down to the beach in Sorrento
A little cove built into the steps leading down to the beach in Sorrento

The hotel is built high up on the cliff’s of Sorrento and to get to the beach you either have to take steps down or take an elevator that is built into the stone cliffs. I had never seen anything like this. We opted to take the stairs one day and we basically walked through and down into a cave that dropped you into the Tyrrhenian Sea or the Gulf of Naples. This wasn’t like going to the beach in the US or the Caribbean. This was basically, okay here’s a cliff, here’s the water, do as you please. There was a small black sand beach area, but I opted for the sun deck that was pretty much at the end of a tiny stone-laden boardwalk. I’d take that over a sandy mess anyday. The views were spectacular!

View from the sun deck at the Grand Hotel Cocumella
View from the sun deck at the Grand Hotel Cocumella
View of Vesuvius from our hotel
View of Vesuvius from our hotel

The view from my hotel room was breathtaking. I had a little balcony and this was the view to the left…. the view to the right was an old church that’s attached to the monastery.

The view from my hotel room
The view from my hotel room

Our first full day in Sorrento was spent exploring the Sorrento Peninsula. We drove to Sant’Agata dei Due Golfi and hiked a trail called Alta via dei Monti Lattari; it’s a path that winds upwards into a beautiful chestnut forest. This trail led to one of the most amazing views I’d ever seen. The Malacoccola trail led us to a view of the entire Gulf of Salerno. We could see the Gulf of Salerno and the Gulf of Sorrento at the same time. It was unbelievable.

View of the Gulf of Salerno from the Malacoccola trail.
View of the Gulf of Salerno from the Malacoccola trail.
Another view from the Malacoccola trail
Another view from the Malacoccola trail – looking at the Gulf of Sorrento (Naples)
Gulf of Salerno pano
Gulf of Salerno pano
HIking the trail of Malacoccola -- my dad behind me.
HIking the trail of Malacoccola — my dad behind me.
Another spectacular view of the Gulf of Salerno
Another spectacular view of the Gulf of Salerno
Here's my mom on the hike - I think she'd say this hike was her most challenging endeavor ever!
Here’s my mom on the hike – I think she’d say this hike was her most challenging endeavor ever!
Here I am at the top of the trail - standing between both Gulfs
Here I am at the top of the trail – standing between both Gulfs

After these pictures of us on top of the trail were taken, we had to climb down steep rocks. Looking down to the left was not pleasant — if someone has vertigo, I wouldn’t recommend it! On our hike down we passed through some farms and villages. This donkey was one of the highlights!

A cute donkey that I wanted to take home
A cute donkey that I wanted to take home

We continued our hike and ended up in Torca, where our shuttle bus met us and drove us to our lunch stop; a family-owned organic farm! I told one of our guides that in the States this would be called “Farm to Table” — he’d never heard that term before and he was happy to learn it! In Italy they call it “0 Kilometers,” which also makes sense. These types of farms that serve their home grown food is called Agriturismo; agricultural tourism. The name of the farm is Fattoria Terranova. They served us so much food! I couldn’t keep up. I’ve never been a fan of eggplant, but I made myself try it here, and I’m now a fan. Not sure if I’ll eat it in the US, but I’ll definitely eat it again in Italy. We also got a Mozzarella making demo and then ate the fresh made result! Eating here was definitely quite the Italian experience.

Here we learn how to make and braid mozzarella
Here we learn how to make and braid mozzarella
Some potted moss plants at the farm
Some potted moss plants at the farm
The mozzarella that was made at our table side
The mozzarella that was made at our table side
Recipe for Limoncello
Debra holding a recipe for Limoncello

Throughout the trip I was fixated on all of the Catholic symbolism found throughout Italy.  I’ll be posting some of my “Mary Collection.” Every village we went through had shrines like this.

One of the many
One of the many “Marys”
More religious decorations
More religious decorations

Italy is strewn with flowers that I’d never seen before.  Here’s a Passion Flower.

Passion Flower
Passion Flower

After lunch we had a short walk back to our bus.  We then had the option of going on another hike or going back to Sorrento for some pool or beach time. I opted for the pool/beach time.

The pool at Grand Hotel Cocumella
The pool at Grand Hotel Cocumella
View from the beach looking up at the cliffs where the hotel is
View from the beach looking up at the cliffs where the hotel is
View of the beach/sundeck
View of the beach/sundeck

We did a little bit of walking to and from the town center of Sorrento, but we didn’t get to explore it as much as we would have liked to. The streets of Sorrento are covered with Jasmine and some purple flowers (I don’t know what they’re called). The sunset is supposed to be quite a scene from a particular part of the town, but we didn’t get to see it.

Jasmine is found throughout the Amalfi Coast
Jasmine is found throughout the Amalfi Coast
Beautiful unknown flowers
Beautiful unknown flowers
Sorrento sunset
Sorrento sunset

The next morning we took a boat from Sorrento to Capri. This boat was kinda packed, so we didn’t get a good seat, but I’m not complaining. Capri was a little different than what I expected. I think I just envisioned everything being less crowded! Capri was very crowded, but very beautiful. The island is home to about 5,000 people, but during the day that number doubles thanks to tourism. There are 2 parts to the island; Capri and Anacapri. We stayed on the Capri side. We arrived and took the funicular to a higher elevation. If you’re not familiar with a Funicular; check this out: Capri Funicular. There are barely any roads on Capri, so no one has a car.  You’re basically walking on narrow and steep streets. It makes you realize a few things 1) how out of shape you might be 2) that older people in Italy are strong and they don’t let things bother them. So, woman or man up!

Approaching Capri
Approaching Capri

After we rode the funicular up to the top we got off and began our hike along the narrow footpaths. Our destination was Villa Jovis; built by Emperor Tiberius in the 3rd century as a strategic point where he could dominate and control the opposite coast. As we approached Villa Jovis, we noticed a HUGE statue, but we weren’t able to tell what it was until we got closer. Once again, it’s Mary!

Huge statue of Mary
Huge statue of Mary
View of Capri from our hike
View of Capri from our hike
Me and my mom hiking on Capri
Me and my mom hiking on Capri
Me at Villa Jovis and that's Anacapri in the background
Me at Villa Jovis and that’s Anacapri in the background
The Jump of Tiberius - a sheer cliff soaring more than 1,100 feet - infamous site from which Tiberius had his enemies thrown into the sea
The Jump of Tiberius – a sheer cliff soaring more than 1,100 feet – infamous site from which Tiberius had his enemies thrown into the sea

People believe that the Isle of Capri gets its name from the Latin word Capreae (goat).  Needless to say, I was extatic when we stumbled upon some wild goats.  Being a Capricorn, this was right up my alley!

Wild goats of Capri
Wild goats of Capri

After our hike up to Villa Jovis, we strolled back down and had lunch at a small local pizza/sandwich shop. Children’s art decorated the outside walls.

A child's drawing of Mary
A child’s drawing of Mary
Street lights in Capri
Street lights in Capri
House front in Capri
House front in Capri

After our hike we had a couple of hours to stroll around Capri on our own. Debra, one of our guides, mentioned that there was a perfume shop on the island that makes perfume from the flowers found on the island. The name of the store is Carthusia. Apparently, in 1380, the father prior of the Carthusian Monastery of St. James, caught unaware by the news of the arrival of Queen Joan of Anjou on Capri, picked a boquet of the most beautiful flowers on the island; these remained in the same water for 3 days and, as he went to throw them away, the prior noticed that it had acquired a mysterious frangrance unkonw to him. So he turned to the friar versed in alchemy, who traced the origin of the scent to the “Garofilium Silvestre Caprese.” That waster was the first perfume of Capri. History relates that in 1948 the Prior of the Charterhouse found the old perfume formulae and, upon obtaining permission from the Pope, revealed them to a chemist from Piemonte in the North of Italy, and thus created the smallest perfume laboratory in the world, calling it “Carthusia”, i.e. “Charterhouse”. In case you’re interested, here’s the link to Carthusia.

I am a perfume enthusiast, so stopping at this local store made my day. I walked to the store with fellow travelers, Patt and Jim. We started smelling what they had to offer and I wasn’t having much luck. An older Italian lady was sitting in a chair next to the counter; she seemed to be waiting for her daughter to finish her purchase. As I was smelling the perfumes, she seemed to want to give her opinion on what I was spraying. She didn’t speak one lick of English! The coolest part of this story — she ended up picking out the perfume for me. She handed me what she liked, had me try it, smelled my arm, and BOOM; decision made! She was such a cute lady. After I made my purchase and left I asked Patt and Jim if we could go back because I wanted to get my picture taken with the woman that helped me; something to remember her by. She seemed to be excited that I wanted my picture taken with her. She was so cute!

Me and my perfume master
Me and my perfume master

Our time in Capri was too short. On my next visit I’d like to stay overnight there and walk around more. It’s pretty crowded with tourists, but it’s definitely not to be missed. We did not go to the famous Blue Grotto. We had heard that it’s not what it’s cracked up to be and takes time.

Our next adventure put us on a boat from Capri to the Amalfi Coast! This boat was smaller and we were able to get good seats with amazing views of the coastline.

Leaving Capri
Leaving Capri
Until next time, Capri!
Until next time, Capri!

I believe we were on the boat for about 1.5 hours; cruising the Amalfi Coast.  The views were unlike anything I’ve ever seen. We passed quite a few little towns on the water – Positano and Praiano were the major ones and we docked in Amalfi. We got a sneak preview of Positano, which is where we ended before we set off to Rome.

A sneak preview of Positano
A sneak preview of Positano
Praiano; a town between Amalfi and Positano
Praiano; a town between Amalfi and Positano
Amalfi - our destination
Amalfi – our destination

Once we arrived in Amalfi, our private bus took us to a small village called Ravello. We stayed in a hotel called Villa Fraulo.  The scenic views were unreal and the hotel was pretty nice as well. Ravello is known for its association with music. German compser, Richard Wagner, was inspired here to create music for the scene in Klingsor’s magic garden in his oper Parsifal.

View from hotel
View from hotel
Scenic beauty!
Scenic beauty!
Cat of Ravello
Cat of Ravello
Anothe cat of Ravello
Another cat of Ravello

For our first day in Ravello, my mom and I decided to skip the hike and explore the village of Ravello. We visited the church, stores, and took in the local views. We also sat by the pool, but it was a tad too cold to get in.

The Duomo of Ravello
The Duomo of Ravello
More Mary in the Duomo of Ravello
More Mary in the Duomo of Ravello
Priest in action!
Priest in action!

Ravello is known for it’s ceramics. There are quite a few stores to shop at, but apparently this one is THE ONE. We purchased a few items.

The place to get ceramics in Ravello!
The place to get ceramics in Ravello!
My mom and I in scenic Ravello
My mom and I in scenic Ravello
Infinity pool that was too cold for me
Infinity pool that was too cold for me
The village of Ravello
The village of Ravello
Village of Ravello
Village of Ravello
My mom found a good store
My mom found a good store
yes, I'm obsessed
Yes, I’m obsessed
My favorite cat picture from the trip
My favorite cat picture from the trip

In the afternoon we went to lunch at another Agriturismo; a family run trattoria. We had traditional Neopolitan dishes – pizza and tons of veggies. Then, we traced vineyard-laden terraces to the Valley of the Ferriere, a magnificent nature reserve in the Valley of the Mills.

Fresh food from a family owned farm
Fresh food from a family owned farm
more roaming cats
more roaming cats
Example of some of the stairs in the villages
Example of some of the stairs in the villages
More religious decorations
More religious decorations
View of Amalfi from our hike in Valley of the Mills
View of Amalfi from our hike in Valley of the Mills
Valley of the Ferriere
Valley of the Ferriere
And even more lemon tree groves
Amazing lemon tree groves
More local goods!
More local goods!

We walked down a trail covered in moss and ferns and our trip leaders showed us calcara, large pits where lime was made by burning huge blocks of limestone for days. We also saw spandituri, or paper-hangers, buildings now in ruins but once used to dry paper. As we reached Amalfi, we stopped at the Museu della Carta, a unjique museum housed in an ancient paper mill, where we learned how paper was made from rags. During the 15th century, Amalfi’s paper was so prized that many foreign authors demanded to be published in Naples just so they could use the coveted material. I honestly could have done without this tour, but some might find it interesting.

We then strolled around Amalfi and visited the Duomo and relaxed with some gelato.

Fountain in Amalfi
Fountain in Amalfi
Another statue in Amalfi
Another statue in Amalfi
Religious art in Amalfi
Religious art in Amalfi
The Duomo in Amalfi
The Duomo in Amalfi
Duomo art
Duomo art

The following day we took our shuttle to Agerola, Italy’s dairy capital, where we gradually descended on foot along a scenic stretch between Biscotto Caves and Nocelle known as the “Path of the Gods” for its heavenly views.

Start on the Path of the Gods
Start on the Path of the Gods
Along the Path of the Gods
Along the Path of the Gods
Horses in action on the Path of the Gods
Horses in action on the Path of the Gods
Another amazing view along the path
Another amazing view along the path
Hiking along the Path of the Gods
Hiking along the Path of the Gods
Taking a lil break
Taking a lil break
Signage
Signage
More religious stuff
More religious stuff in Nocelle

We continued walking to Montepertuso, where, according to legend, the Madonna was challenged by the devil to punch a hole in a towering moutain (pertuso means “hole” in Neapolitan dialect). The views from there were amazing. From Montepertuso, we took a shuttle to our next destination, Positano, built as a nativity scene set on the side of a mountain. We climbed down over 3 Thousand steps to get down to that village! I forget the exact number, but my legs were shaking!

View of Positano
View of Positano

The hotel we stayed at in Positano may have been the best. We stayed at Hotel Palazzo Murat. It was very close to the beach and the scenery surrounding it looked almost fake.

Outside of the Murat
Murat Courtyard
Hotel courtyard
More Murat courtyard
Santa Maria Assunta Church in Positano (right next to our hotel)
Santa Maria Assunta Church in Positano (right next to our hotel)
Close-up of the church
Close-up of the church
Beautiful colors of Positano
Beautiful colors of Positano
Hey!
Hey!
Beach of Positano
Beach of Positano
So many colors!
So many colors!
Another beach shot
Another beach shot
More religious symbols
More religious symbols
Cool planter!
Cool planter!
Night view of Positano from my hotel room balcony
Night view of Positano from my hotel room balcony

For our last day along the Amalfi Coast, we took our shuttle up 2,000 feet to the town of Santa Maria del Castello, where many hillside trails converge from the sourrounding Lattari Mountains, or as our guides called them “the Milky Mountains.” We walked through a chestnut forest and saw mules working hard carrying the tree trunks down from the forest. On our way to Santa Maria, we stopped in Ticciano to view a private Italian home. The family also makes homemade Limoncello! I made sure to make that purchase! They also had chickens and roosters.

Limoncello from a family house in Ticciano
Limoncello from a family house in Ticciano
Roosters in Ticciano
Roosters in Ticciano
Kitchen in private home
Kitchen in private home – copper pots that are over 100 years old. The pots stay in the house when the house is sold because the pots are custom fit to the stove!
These are the mules that carry the chestnut tree trunks
These are the mules that carry the chestnut tree trunks
Santa Maria del Castello
Santa Maria del Castello

And now for the view from this wonderful spot. I was so nervous standing here because I felt like one wrong step and I’d be a goner!

View of Positano from Santa Maria del Castello
View of Positano from Santa Maria del Castello

And then my dad made me pose close to the edge.

That's Positano way down there! Scary.
That’s Positano way down there! Scary.
me
Me from the top of Santa Maria del Castello

At the end of this hike we had a lunch that was prepared by the woman whose house we visited — the lady with the copper pots and roosters.  It was AMAZING! We had eggplant parmesan, a potato salad, and a tomato salad. We setup the picnic outside of an old church.

Yummy homemade Italian lunch
Yummy homemade Italian lunch
Old Church where we had our picnic lunch
Old Church where we had our picnic lunch
Some local dogs that want our food!
Some local dogs that want our food!

After lunch we headed back down to Positano to enjoy our last evening there.

Another view of Positano from the hotel. I did NOT want to leave.
Another view of Positano from the hotel. I did NOT want to leave.
Positano beach
Positano beach
And finally one last view from the pool
And finally one last view from the pool
My mom and dad at our final group dinner in Positano
My mom and dad at our final group dinner in Positano
Our amazing trip leaders; Debra and Martin
Our amazing trip leaders; Debra and Martin

Sadly, our stay on the Amalfi Coast had to end; we were transported to Rome via private shuttle. I believe the ride was a little over 3 hours. We were on our own in Rome – no guides. This is the kind of travel I’m accustomed to, but once left in Rome we really missed our guides. I enjoyed Rome from a historical viewpoint, but that’s about it. I could’ve stayed in Amalfi the whole time. Enjoy the below pictures of Rome!

One of the MANY MANY MANY statues in Rome
One of the MANY MANY MANY statues in Rome
I don't remember where this was
I don’t remember where this was
More of Mary
More of Mary
The Pantheon
The Pantheon
This one's missing some fingers
This one’s missing some fingers
Look into my eyes that have no pupils!
Look into my eyes!
The Colesseum
The Colesseum
Me at the Colesseum
Me at the Colesseum
Outside of the Colesseum
Outside of the Colesseum
Near the Colesseum
Near the Colesseum
Birds and statues
Birds and statues
The Roman Forum
The Roman Forum
The Roman Forum
The Roman Forum
The Roman Forum
The Roman Forum
Birds at the Roman Forum
Birds at the Roman Forum
The Typewriter Building
The Typewriter Building
City of Cats in Rome - Also where Julius Caesar was killed
City of Cats in Rome – Also where Julius Caesar was killed
Man and his Ham
Man and his Ham
Caprese
Caprese
The easiest and tastiest meal -  Prosciutto and Mozzarella!
The easiest and tastiest meal – Prosciutto and Mozzarella!
Meeting with Pope Francis
Meeting with Pope Francis
More statues with birds
More statues with birds near the Vatican
Statues near the Vatican
Statues near the Vatican
View of St. Peter's
View of St. Peter’s
Another view of St. Peter's
Another view of St. Peter’s
Roman stuff
Roman stuff
Roar
Roar
View of St. Peter's while at the Vatican Museum
View of St. Peter’s while at the Vatican Museum
The Vatican Museum
The Vatican Museum
more of the many many statues in Rome at the Vatican Museum
more of the many many statues in Rome at the Vatican Museum
Emperors of Rome - Vatican Museum
Emperors of Rome – Vatican Museum
i love these
I love these
side view
side view
This statue inspired Michaelangelo to create The David - At the Vatican Museum
This statue inspired Michaelangelo to create The David – At the Vatican Museum
oh the drama
oh the drama
dogs of Rome
Dogs of Rome
Bacchus
Bacchus
Ancient lady of Rome
Ancient lady of Rome
Mary
Mary
Illegal picture of the Sistine Chapel
Illegal picture of the Sistine Chapel
Zoomed in on
Zoomed in on “Creation”
St. Peter's - Angelic gates
St. Peter’s – Angelic gates
A list of all the Popes - St. Peter's
A list of all the Popes – St. Peter’s
The Swiss Guard outside the Vatican
The Swiss Guard outside the Vatican
Stations of the Cross outside St. Peter's
Stations of the Cross outside St. Peter’s
St. Peter's/The Vatican
St. Peter’s/The Vatican
They're watching you
They’re watching you
Mochaccino
Mochaccino
Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Amalfi and Beyond!

  1. Allison, I LOVE your blog. Thanks for all the commentary on your beautiful pics. It will be so helpful in identifying my own photos – which, of course, I didn’t label and can’t remember where it all was!

    Like

  2. Al! I missed when you posted this to FB, randomly remembered that you said you were going to blog about your trip and scrolled through your feed to find this today! So awesome! Your pictures are amazing and loved hearing about your trip! Sounds like it was incredible!! We are moving back to the states in Sept and taking one last hurrah trip through Italy with my parents just before 🙂 :)! This makes me super excited for it!! Keep posting about your adventures!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s